Arts, Culture & Heritage

Nzundza Portrait

Last Updated: April 3, 2024
Artist

Hannelie Coetzee

A Brief History

The artwork celebrates how culturally mixed hair styles are being rewoven and expressed in new and current ways. The Ndzundza Ndebele culture who lived in the Highveld from the 1630s until the late 1600s embraced a cultural inclusivity which often included other ethnicities such as Swazi and Zulu en-route to better livelihoods. Much like Johannesburg today. These historical traces were discovered on pottery that dated from the time and from research and though oral history. Thus, the meaning of the artwork is embedded in the medium (crockery). Monochromatic tones of blue and turquoise crockery from Johannesburg potteries and ceramic factories were selected. The artist also read Wits Architecture graduate thesis who studied hair saloons in the city. This young academic brought the traditional inspiration to trendy hairstyles to my attention.

Description

10 Storey high crockery mosaic artwork

Artwork Signage

The artwork celebrates how culturally mixed hair styles are being rewoven and expressed in new and current ways. The Ndzundza Ndebele culture who lived in the Highveld from the 1630s until the late 1600s embraced a cultural inclusivity which often included other ethnicities such as Swazi and Zulu en-route to better livelihoods. Much like Johannesburg today. These historical traces were discovered on pottery that dated from the time and from research and though oral history. Thus, the meaning of the artwork is embedded in the medium (crockery). Monochromatic tones of blue and turquoise crockery from Johannesburg potteries and ceramic factories were selected. The artist also read Wits Architecture graduate thesis who studied hair saloons in the city. This young academic brought the traditional inspiration to trendy hairstyles to my attention.

Location & Address

North City House, Corner Jorrisen and Melle Str, Braamfontein, Johannesburg